Native American

My Favorite Sedona Ruins

If you’ve followed my work for any length of time, you undoubtedly are familiar with my love for Sedona. While it may be a world-famous tourist destination, it’s a great place to escape the crowds—and actually, if you go far enough into any Sedona canyon, you are unlikely to see anyone. But beyond the views …

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Cave of Munits

While planning a recent California vacation, I came across a name—The Cave of Munits—I was intrigued, and so began the journey and the research. The Cave of Munits practically rides the county line between Ventura and Los Angeles in the Upper Las Virgenes Canyon Open Space Preserve. Amidst the urban sprawl, El Escorpion Trail takes …

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Ancient Creek Ruins, Sierra Ancha Wilderness

These ancient dwellings are built into a small alcove overlooking a creek in the Sierra Ancha Wilderness. Their likely construction, sometime between 1280 and 1350 A.D., was determined, in part, by the tree rings found in the beams along the roof. I have visited a number of ruins in the Sierra Ancha Wilderness, much of …

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Village Of Rio Puerco, Petrified Forest

This is the Village of Rio Puerco, thought to have been settled by the Pueblo natives (Anasazi) from 1250 to 1380 A.D. It is believed that a series of droughts led them from scattered living to congregating in large pueblo communities, such as this. The Village is located near the banks of the Puerco River. …

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Historic Clevenger House, Superior, Arizona

This lovingly-crafted stone and mortar home was once that of the Robert Clevenger family, in the early 1900s. Built in Queen Creek Canyon, the northern wall is the canyon, itself. The majestic Picketpost Mountain looms to the South, and the ghost town of Pinal once stood less than one mile to the east (as the …

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Ancient Salado Cave Dwellings In The Superstition Wilderness

The Superstition Wilderness is rich in history and legend. It seems you could spend a lifetime searching every canyon, turning every corner, and climbing every mountain, and still not see it all.  While there is much to see, these dwellings—built around six-hundred years ago, and once called home by the Salado—is perhaps the most interesting …

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Prehistoric Hohokam Irrigation Canals, Phoenix Metro

What you’re looking at, right here, is an ancient irrigation canal just north of downtown Tempe, Arizona. That’s right! And, it’s far from the only one in the Salt River Valley. It is believed that the Hohokam entered the region sometime around 300 B.C. They went on to build an extensive network of over five-hundred …

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The Apache Leap And Apache Tears

These small obsidian stones and volcanic glass are what’s known as “Apache Tears.” The story goes… In the 1870s, the military ambushed several scores of the Apache tribe on a cliff overlooking what is now known as Superior, Arizona. Many Apache were killed on the spot, and those that remained chose suicide as they ran …

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Beautiful Trough Metate

Check out this beautiful Trough Metate! The accompanying grinding stone—known as a Mano—would have been a perfect fit for this specific Metate, and not a good fit for any other, thus, not interchangeable. While the Basin-type Metates I have shared previously (visit link below) were intended for single-hand use and grinding in a circular motion, …

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